Archive for May, 2012

Disability Insurance Isn’t Sexy!

Friday, May 18th, 2012

 

 

We are constantly bombarded with stats about dwindling Social Security funds; especially as they relate to retirement – but what about disability? Every bit as important, disability funding is more relevant for working people because it is a benefit that may help you now.

 

According to statistics sited in National Underwriter Magazine, the year end Federal Disability Trust Fund balance for 2011 was $154 billion in assets, down 15% from last year. Funded by a 1.51% payroll tax, the total amount generated in 2011 was $109 billion, which was down 19% from 2010.

 

These numbers suggest the fund may be depleted as early as 2016, two years earlier than previously projected. Adequate funding is anything but reliable in the long term.

 

More Hurdles to Consider

 

Funding issues aside, if you avoid insuring your family’s income because you can file for and receive benefits, think again.

 

Social Security Disability Insurance is a dicey issue at best. Only 35% of SSDI applicants are approved for benefits on their initial application and an additional 10% are approved after appeal. Translation: over half of all SSDI applicants are denied coverage.

 

Part of the reason for such a high denial rate is the SSDI definition of disability is often more stringent than that of a commercial insurance company. SSDI defines disability as the inability to perform a job due to a medical condition. Conversely, many commercial insurance contracts define disability as the inability to perform the job for which you have been trained or educated to perform.

 

Think about that a moment…

 

Take for example an electrician that is trained to work on business and/or residential electrical systems. If said electrician has a back injury that renders him incapable of physically demanding work that would be required of an electrician, he would most likely qualify for benefits under a commercial disability. That same electrician will most likely not qualify under SSDI if he would still be able to perform another type of work, such as answering telephones.

 

These defining terms can often be the difference between receiving benefits and not receiving them. Bearing this information in mind, it is scary to think of the ramifications attached to the dismissal of addressing these issues. Why then, do so many of us neglect to protect our family?

 

The Cost of Complacency

 

The lack of appropriate planning usually stems from several things. Exasperation at the thought of having to deal with yet another thing definitely plays into it. All we want to do when we get home from work is tune out and relax, right? The last thing on our minds is contemplating the pros and cons of disability insurance. Cost, like with anything else, plays a big role too. Yet cost, in this case, has to do with your family’s security.

 

The cost of protection may be more than you want to spend on the surface, but the cost of complacency in the event the unthinkable becomes reality, can be devastating. We all think it won’t happen to us, but the statistics tell a completely different story.

 

Here are some eye opening stats related to disability and the workforce:

 

1. A 35 year old has a 50% chance of a disability lasting 90 days or longer before turning 65.

 

2. Most people in the US are better prepared for death than a disability even though chances are 3 to 5 times greater that a disability will occur (based on age).

 

3. About 1 in 7 people between ages 35 and 65 can expect to be disabled for 5 years or longer.

 

4. About 110 million people have NO long term disability insurance.

 

5. Benefits from disability insurance from an employer sponsored plan are usually taxable while benefits from a privately purchased plan are tax free.

 

Take Away

 

What we spend our money on is a direct reflection of how we choose to allocate it. Cost, in reality, is truly not the deciding factor. Who isn’t a master at finding ways to buy things when you’ve got a big hankering for something?

 

Disability insurance isn’t sexy; it’s not something you’ll ever have a ‘hankering’ for, nor is it mandatory, like auto insurance. When it comes to spending money on things we can’t see, touch or feel immediately, our normal inclination is to back burner it.

 

When you move protecting your ability to earn income to the front burner, the good news is, cost is a very flexible thing. Personally tailored planning will provide you with protection conformed to budget.

 

Kurt Rusch CLU, ChFC