Online Auto Insurance


 

Do-It-Yourself is big online today. Consumers like to pick out what they want and get quotes from the anonymity of their own computers. Except, of course, for those annoying vendors who call incessantly once you hit “submit”, people can shop incognito most of the time.

 

The insurance industry offers equal accessibility. Who doesn’t like the thought of not having to talk to the Boogeyman (aka insurance agent) when looking for a good deal online? There is no doubt that D-I-Y is convenient, but getting a good deal does not translate to getting good coverage in the insurance biz. More often than not, it’s more like D-Y-I: Do Yourself In.

 

Cyber Gap

 

The most common insurance market being hawked online by companies today is automobile insurance. My personal observation: consumers really don’t understand what they are purchasing. For example, let’s take a look at Joe Blow. He has a $400,000 home and just switched his auto insurance (online) to save $400 a year keeping the same deductible.

 

Joe saved premium by dropping the liability coverage on his three vehicles from $250,000/$500,000/$100,000 to the state minimum: $20,000/$40,000/$15,000 (in Illinois). What Joe did in saving that extra $400 per year was expose himself, his paychecks, savings and home.

 

Many people don’t understand the significance of this switch. When Joe switched to minimum liability coverage, in reality he agreed to the following if at fault in an accident:

 

1. He will be personally responsible for any injuries caused over $20,000 per person.

 

2. He will be personally responsible for any personal injuries totaling over $40,000 for all passengers in the other vehicle.

 

3. He will be personally responsible for any property damage over $15,000.

 

The shortcomings here are obvious; medical costs are exorbitant and low end new cars are selling for more than $15,000 these days. That $400 a year won’t do much towards replacing property or paying doctors’ bills. Add to this what could happen to Joe in the worst case scenario: causing someone else’s death. A wrongful death lawsuit stemming from an auto accident could have you working for the decedent’s family for the rest of your life.

 

Lesson Learned

 

Simply put, when consumers opt for the lowest price with disregard for the very benefits they’re buying, they open themselves up to a plethora of problems down the road.

 

Tread very carefully before you cyber drive insurance. Be armed with the knowledge of what is and is not covered and do your homework before you make a decision – don’t jeopardize your lifestyle.

 

Alternatively, work with an insurance broker, (yes, I am one), who has access to numerous carriers to draw from in finding coverage appropriate to your cost and benefit standpoint.

 

Kurt Rusch  CLU, ChFC

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