Debt & Income Insurance

In the world of insurance, there are two kinds: debt insurance and income insurance. Most consumers don’t think of it in that way, but it is important to understand what these classifications really mean and what they can provide to you.

Debt Insurance

Medical Insurance – pays for your medical bills so your family will not incur the debt of a medical procedure.

Automobile Insurance – pays for expenses incurred as a result of owning a car. The expenses covered will not only include the physical damage to your car but the liability that may incur to others as a result of you operating your car. This coverage is mandated by the states as well as physical damage coverage if the car is financed.

Homeowners Insurance – pays for physical damage to the home as well as liability that may arise while living in the home subject to policy limitations. And, as we all know, homeowners is also mandated when homes are mortgaged.

Long Term Care Insurance – pays for the cost of daily care when a person is no longer able to take care of themselves.

The common thread among these contracts is that all of them ultimately will pay someone else: mechanics, builder, caregivers, doctors and so on. Simply put, debt insurance helps us navigate emergencies and avoid life altering debt as much as possible. What debt insurance does not provide is protection of our income lifelines.

Income Insurance

The way to insure one’s income is by securing the proper amount of Disability Insurance. Debt insurance provides coverage of expenses incurred; disability insurance provides the money needed for your family to live on if you become sick or injured and unable to perform your job.

Many people mistakenly assume disability insurance is unnecessary because the Social Security system will provide for us in the event of a disability. While there is some truth to this, there are gaping holes which exist in actual benefit redemption.

First, the vast majority of claims that are filed with the Social Security Administration for disability are denied. 65% of initial claim applications were denied in 2009.* Secondly, the definition that social security uses for disability is vastly different than the verbiage commonly used by private providers. Over 51 million Americans classify themselves as fully or partially disabled. Only 8 million disabled wage earners were receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits as of June 2010.* Finally, the amount that you qualify for can vary greatly from the amount you may qualify for on a private contract. The average SSDI monthly benefit payment in 2010 was $1,065 per month. 52% of claimants received less than $1,000 per month.*

* Statistics as reported by the Council for Disability Awareness

In the world of consumer choices, there are two kinds: what you want and what you need. Evaluate your needs at a deeper level than face value; what do you really need to do to protect and provide for yourself and your family?

Kurt Rusch  CLU, ChFC

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