Posts Tagged ‘Disability Insurance’

Disability Insurance Isn’t Sexy!

Friday, May 18th, 2012

 

 

We are constantly bombarded with stats about dwindling Social Security funds; especially as they relate to retirement – but what about disability? Every bit as important, disability funding is more relevant for working people because it is a benefit that may help you now.

 

According to statistics sited in National Underwriter Magazine, the year end Federal Disability Trust Fund balance for 2011 was $154 billion in assets, down 15% from last year. Funded by a 1.51% payroll tax, the total amount generated in 2011 was $109 billion, which was down 19% from 2010.

 

These numbers suggest the fund may be depleted as early as 2016, two years earlier than previously projected. Adequate funding is anything but reliable in the long term.

 

More Hurdles to Consider

 

Funding issues aside, if you avoid insuring your family’s income because you can file for and receive benefits, think again.

 

Social Security Disability Insurance is a dicey issue at best. Only 35% of SSDI applicants are approved for benefits on their initial application and an additional 10% are approved after appeal. Translation: over half of all SSDI applicants are denied coverage.

 

Part of the reason for such a high denial rate is the SSDI definition of disability is often more stringent than that of a commercial insurance company. SSDI defines disability as the inability to perform a job due to a medical condition. Conversely, many commercial insurance contracts define disability as the inability to perform the job for which you have been trained or educated to perform.

 

Think about that a moment…

 

Take for example an electrician that is trained to work on business and/or residential electrical systems. If said electrician has a back injury that renders him incapable of physically demanding work that would be required of an electrician, he would most likely qualify for benefits under a commercial disability. That same electrician will most likely not qualify under SSDI if he would still be able to perform another type of work, such as answering telephones.

 

These defining terms can often be the difference between receiving benefits and not receiving them. Bearing this information in mind, it is scary to think of the ramifications attached to the dismissal of addressing these issues. Why then, do so many of us neglect to protect our family?

 

The Cost of Complacency

 

The lack of appropriate planning usually stems from several things. Exasperation at the thought of having to deal with yet another thing definitely plays into it. All we want to do when we get home from work is tune out and relax, right? The last thing on our minds is contemplating the pros and cons of disability insurance. Cost, like with anything else, plays a big role too. Yet cost, in this case, has to do with your family’s security.

 

The cost of protection may be more than you want to spend on the surface, but the cost of complacency in the event the unthinkable becomes reality, can be devastating. We all think it won’t happen to us, but the statistics tell a completely different story.

 

Here are some eye opening stats related to disability and the workforce:

 

1. A 35 year old has a 50% chance of a disability lasting 90 days or longer before turning 65.

 

2. Most people in the US are better prepared for death than a disability even though chances are 3 to 5 times greater that a disability will occur (based on age).

 

3. About 1 in 7 people between ages 35 and 65 can expect to be disabled for 5 years or longer.

 

4. About 110 million people have NO long term disability insurance.

 

5. Benefits from disability insurance from an employer sponsored plan are usually taxable while benefits from a privately purchased plan are tax free.

 

Take Away

 

What we spend our money on is a direct reflection of how we choose to allocate it. Cost, in reality, is truly not the deciding factor. Who isn’t a master at finding ways to buy things when you’ve got a big hankering for something?

 

Disability insurance isn’t sexy; it’s not something you’ll ever have a ‘hankering’ for, nor is it mandatory, like auto insurance. When it comes to spending money on things we can’t see, touch or feel immediately, our normal inclination is to back burner it.

 

When you move protecting your ability to earn income to the front burner, the good news is, cost is a very flexible thing. Personally tailored planning will provide you with protection conformed to budget.

 

Kurt Rusch CLU, ChFC

What if you couldn’t work and pay bills?

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

 

 

According to statistics provided by the Social Security Administration, 3 in 10 workers entering the workforce today will become disabled before they retire. If that stat isn’t staggering enough, consider the fact that 71% of Americans would find it very difficult or somewhat difficult to meet their current obligations if their paycheck was delayed by just one week. This is a potential recipe for disaster.

 

A full 64% of wage earners believe that they have a 2% or less chance of becoming disabled when the actual percentage is more like 30%. Another misconception is that Social Security will pay disability benefits. While this is possible, it is only true to a small extent; 65% of new disability claims with Social Security were denied in 2009. For the fortunate 35% who were able to receive benefits, the average monthly payment was $1065.

 

Consider further the fact that 90% of disabling events happen outside the workplace, where Workers’ Comp does not apply, and we are looking at major gaps in one’s financial plans. Bottom line? There is a gross underestimation of the chances of becoming disabled over one’s working lifetime.

 

Biggest challenge? Being able to initiate and continue funding a financial plan. In the event of a disability, you will potentially lose anywhere from a month to a lifetime of future income that will make funding any other hopes and dreams for your future difficult if not impossible.

 

Overcoming Obstacles & Putting the Pieces Together

 

The common argument against additional planning is that there is no money left after allocating standard premium dollars for car, house, health and life insurance. The good news is that often, by simply changing the terms of your current contracts, you can obtain protective coverage with little or no additional out of pocket expense. While statistics show this is too important to ignore, 67% of workers in the private sector still have no provisions for long term disability.

 

More than worthy of further investigation, there are numerous variables that will influence the amount premium paid for disability contracts. Firstly, your current health is a big factor to qualify for this contract. Influences include height/weight ratio, chronic conditions including not only medical issues but injury history as well. The usual readings for blood pressure, cholesterol and the like will also influence the situation.

 

Next is occupation. Since the likelihood of becoming disabled in a physical pursuit such as a mechanic is much more likely than it would be for an accountant, the rates will be reflected accordingly.

 

The monthly benefit amount received will be very important in determining the premium. Insurance companies will typically limit you to about 65% of your current income which approximately reflects your current take home pay. The reason for this is that the insurance company does not want you to be better off financially on disability than working nor support a financial disincentive to get back to work.

 

One key point to keep in mind when considering how much coverage you desire: personally paid for disability insurance benefits are not subject to Federal Income Taxes. That provides savings at a time when you will need it the most.

 

The benefit period you choose is also of paramount importance. You can select a 1 year policy all the way up to a lifetime policy which will typically pay your benefit until the time that you typically would be retiring from work.

 

Finally, the elimination period for disability insurance is like a deductible. This reflects the time after you are unable to work before you can begin to collect benefits. The longer you wait before you begin to collect benefits, the lower the premium.

 

Putting all these pieces together in a strategic manner should be your main objective. It is highly possible to customize a plan that will not only provide security to you and your family but also work within the parameters of your budget.

 

Kurt Rusch  CLU,ChFC